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Museums

Alexandria Archaeology Museum

The Torpedo Factory Art Center
105 N. Union St., No. 327
Alexandria, Va., 22314
703-838-4399
Web site: www.alexandriaarchaeology.org
Free admission.
Hours: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays; closed New Year's Day, Easter, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving and the day after, and Christmas Eve and Christmas.

Alexandria Black History Museum

902 Wythe St.
Alexandria, Va., 22314
703-838-4356
Web site: www.alexblackhistory.org
Free admission.
Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Closed New Year's Day, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving and the day after, and Christmas Eve and Christmas.

Alexandria National Cemetery

1450 Wilkes Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
Website: www.interment.net/data/us/va/
alexandria/alexannat/

One of the 12 sites established and dedicated by President Abraham Lincoln in early 1862 to serve as military burial grounds. The cemetery contains some 3,500 graves of Civil War soldiers, including men who served in the United States Colored Troops and four soldiers who lost their lives chasing President Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth.

Alexandria Seaport Center

North of the Torpedo Factory on the waterfront, at the base of Queen Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
(703) 549-7078
Email: asfoffice@alexandriaseaport.org
Web Site: www.alexandriaseaport.org
Daily 9am - 4pm
Free

This floating museum houses a boat building program, a marine sciences lab, and offers a boat livery of small sailing and rowing craft that visitors can rent.

The Athenaeum

201 Prince Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-548-0035
Web Site: www.nvfaa.org
Email: nvfaa@nvfaa.org
Hours: Call for schedule
Admission: Free to all art exhibits

This exquisite example of Greek Revival architecture began its days in 1852 as the Bank of the Old Dominion. Now the treasures it holds are artistic ones. Owned by the members of the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Association, it offers exhibits of paintings, photography, and fine crafts such as rare antique rugs and handmade quilts. The Gallery is open between Easter and the end of October, showing work by area artists and from area collections.

Carlyle House Historic Park

121 N. Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-549-2997
Email: JohnCarlyle@starpower.com
Web Site: www.carlylehouse.org
Hours: Tues - Sat 10 am - 4:00 pm; Sunday 12 - 4:00 pm
Admission: $4 adult; $2 students 11 -1 7; 10 and under free

The only stone Georgian Palladian-style mansion in Alexandria. The Carlyle House Historic Park, complete with period furnishings, is interpreted to the life and times of one of Alexandria's founders and first landowners, John Carlyle. Built 1751-1753, the restored Carlyle House stands as a reminder of Alexandria's prosperity and growth during the mid-eighteenth century. Guided tours explore the topics of merchants, slavery and servants, town property, and family life of the colonial Virginia aristocracy. Grounds include an extensive 18th century style garden.

Christ Church

118 North Washington Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-549-1450
Email: staff@historicchristchurch.org
Website: www.historicchristchurch.org
Hours: Mon - Sat 9am - 4 pm; Sun 2 - 4:30 pm
Admission: None required; contributions greatly appreciated

Christ Episcopal Church was the first church in Alexandria and has been serving its congregation as a place of worship since it was completed in 1773. The design by James Wren is in the colonial Georgian style. The church was originally in a grove of trees on a hill two blocks beyond the then Alexandria city limits The building was constructed of native brick and the stone trim was from the Aquia Creek quarry south of Alexandria. The gallery was added in 1787. The bell tower was constructed in 1818. Wooden tablets on either side of the pulpit are believed to have been hand-lettered by James Wren at the time of construction. Both George Washington and Robert E. Lee were regular worshipers. George Washington's pew, which is preserved in its original state, and Robert E. Lee's pew, are marked. Christ Church is designated as a National Historic Landmark.

Fort Ward Museum and Historic Site

4301 W. Braddock Rd.
Alexandria, Va., 22304
703-838-4848
Email: fort.ward@alexandriava.gov
Web site: www.fortward.org
Free admission; donations welcome.
Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, noon-5 p.m. Sundays. Closed New Year's Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Call for changes in bad weather and for holiday hours.

Friendship Firehouse Museum

107 S. Alfred St.
Alexandria, Va., 22314
703-838-3891
Web site: oha.alexandriava.gov/friendship
Free admission.
Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Closed New Year's Day and Christmas.

Gadsby's Tavern Museum

134 N. Royal St.
Alexandria, Va., 22314
703-838-4242
Web site: www.gadsbystavern.org
$4 for adults, $2 for students ages 11-17, free for children younger than 11 with a paying adult. Free for members of the Gadsby's Tavern Museum Society and Alexandria city employees. Discounted admission for AAA members. Tours start 15 minutes before and after the hour and last about 30 minutes. Tour hours from November-March: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Last tour starts at 3:45 p.m. Tour hours from April-October: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays and Mondays. Last tour begins at 4:45 p.m.
Closed for all major holidays. Office hours are by appointment from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The George Washington Masonic National Memorial

101 Callahan Drive
Alexandria, Virginia 22301-2751
703-683-2007
Email: gseghers@gwmemorial.org
Web Site: www.gwmemorial.org
Hours: 9 am - 4 pm daily, except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day
Admission: Free

Just a mile from the Potomac River, in historic Alexandria, Virginia, stands the 333 ft. George Washington Masonic National Memorial. Dedicated to the memory of George Washington - Patriot, President, Mason - the Memorial was dedicated on May 12, 1932, as an expression of the Masonic fraternity's faith in the principles of civil and religious liberty and orderly government. The George Washington Museum in the Memorial contains the Washington Family Bible and many other Washington artifacts. There are several display rooms in the tower which is surmounted by a spectacular Observation Deck.

 

 

The John Q. Adams Center for the History of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

One Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-519-1579
Email: museum@entnet.org
Website: www.entnet.org
Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Admission: Free

Dedicated to the preservation of the history of otolaryngology (the medical specialty devoted to the treatment of ear, nose, and throat disorders), the Adams Center has extensive library, archival, and museum collections documenting the history of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in the United States and Europe. The diverse collection includes the Rosalind N. and David Myers Hearing Aid Collection; surgical instruments relating to medical procedures of the ear, nose, and throat; medical illustrations; oral histories; and rare books and manuscripts. The Center promotes historical research and provides educational programs for the public.

Lee-Fendall House

614 Oronoco Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
(703) 548-1789
Email: contact@LeeFendallHouse.org
Website: www.leefendallhouse.org
Hours: Tues - Sat 10 am - 4 pm; Sun 1 - 4 pm (last tour 3:45)

This house was built in 1785 by Philip Fendall on land purchased from his cousin Revolutionary War hero Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, father of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Generations of the famous Lee family continued to live in this house until 1903, with the exception of the years between 1863-1865 when the Union Army seized the property for use as a hospital. John L. Lewis, the most powerful and controversial labor leader in American history also made this house his home during the height of his power (1937-1969).

The Lyceum

201 S. Washington St.
Alexandria, Va., 22314
703-838-4994
Web site: www.alexandriahistory.org
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Closed New Year's Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas.
Free admission.

In 1839, a group of gentlemen calling themselves The Alexandria Lyceum joined with the Alexandria Library Company to build a grand hall to provide a place for lectures, scientific experiments and quiet reading.

Eventually, the building itself became known as The Lyceum and, since that time, it has been a Civil War hospital, a private home, an office building and the nation's first Bicentennial Center. In 1985, The Lyceum became Alexandria's History Museum, providing exhibitions, school programs, lectures and concerts, volunteer opportunities and space for rental functions for the community. The Lyceum Museum Shop carries a wide variety of maps, books, note cards and special items related to Alexandria's history. The present-day Lyceum Company serves the museum as a membership and fund-raising organization.

Mount Vernon

3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Hwy.
Mount Vernon, Va., 22121
703-780-2000
Web site: www.mountvernon.org
The estate, home and burial place of George Washington is eight miles south of the city of Alexandria.
Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily April-August; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. March, September and October; and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. November-February. Adults: $13; seniors, $12; ages 6-11, $6; 5 and younger, free.

The Old Presbyterian Meeting House

321 South Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-549-6670
Email: opmh@opmh.org
Website: www.opmh.org/history.htm
Hours: Mon-Fri 9am -3pm
Admission: Free

The Old Presbyterian Meeting House congregation was founded by Alexandria’s original Scottish settlers in 1772. Its current congregation includes 1,000 active members. The sanctuary was built in 1775, and reconstructed as seen today following an 1835 fire. The Meeting House was the site of Alexandria’s memorial services for George Washington. In addition to the sanctuary, the church grounds include Flounder House, built as a parsonage in 1787, Elliot House, originally a private residence erected in 1844, and a burial ground that includes the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution. The Meeting House is a Virginia Historic Landmark and a National Historic Place.

Ramsay House Visitors Center

221 King St.
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-838-4200.
Website: www.funside.com
Hours: Daily 9am - 5pm
Admission: Free

Originally built in the 18th century by William Ramsay, a Scottish merchant and city founder, the house was reconstructed on its original stone foundations. The house now serves as the city's visitors center. Stop by to pick up detailed brochures on attractions, maps, tours, etc. Gift Shop.

The Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum

105-107 South Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-838-3852
E-mail: Apothecary Museum     
The Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum, one of the oldest pharmacies in the nation, exists today to promote a greater understanding of historic public health issues, inspire people with the values of Quaker founder, Edward Stabler, and engage the visitor in an appreciation of our local and national history by sharing the story of this business and family’s profound effect on the community in such diverse areas as education and the abolition of slavery.

Torpedo Factory Art Center

105 N. Union Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
703-838-4565
Website: www.torpedofactory.org
Hours: Daily 10am - 5pm
Admission: Free

Constructed in 1918 for the manufacturing of torpedoes, the factory now serves as working studios for over 160 professional artists. Visitors can purchase wares onsite or simply watch the creative process in action.

U.S. Patent and Trademark Museum

600 Dulany St.
Suite 0100
Alexandria, Va., 22313
571-272-0095
Web site: www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/
ahrpa/opa/museum

Free admission.
Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, noon-5 p.m. Saturdays. Closed all federal holidays.