Sign In or Register here


At 100 King, a New Pan-Asian Restaurant Makes a Go at Remaking History

Kirsten Obadal
By Kirsten Obadal
Posted on Aug 19,2009
Filed Under Restaurants , Local Tastes,
Share  


Photo by John Arundel/Local Kicks<br /> <br />Shuttered for nearly a year after the unfortunate failure of 100 King Restaurant, in which DC restaurateur Peter Malios lost $4.2 million on a BB&T loan which put the location into Foreclosure and then Public Auction, the beleaguered property has become a symbol of a nasty recession that's hit home, hard.  <br />
Photo by John Arundel/Local Kicks
Shuttered for nearly a year after the unfortunate failure of 100 King Restaurant, in
which DC restaurateur Peter Malios lost $4.2 million on a BB&T loan which put
the location into Foreclosure and then Public Auction, the beleaguered property
has become a symbol of a nasty recession that's hit home, hard.

The building at 100 King is one of Alexandria’s most historic and beautiful structures. Designed in 1871 by Benjamin Franklin Price in an Italianate style, the building was completed a year later and housed a corn exchange.  
 
The first story was leased to a green grocer, with the exchange situated on the second story.  This portion was a grand gallery with 25-foot high ornamented ceilings and sky-high windows.  
 

The Alexandria Fire Department, Circa 1870. On Dec. 31, 1872 a massive fire raged through the 100 block, damaging five warehouses which were considered among Alexandria’s most important buildings.  These warehouses contained grain and fertilizer, and the loss of property and structure was estimated at the time at about $100,000, or about $3 million in today's dollars.
The Alexandria Fire Department, Circa 1870. On Dec. 31, 1872
a massive fire raged through the 100 block, damaging five
warehouses which were considered among Alexandria’s most
important buildings. These warehouses contained grain and
fertilizer, and the loss of property and structure was estimated
at the time at about $100,000, or about $3 million in today's
dollars.

The room bustled with business until Dec. 31, 1872, when a massive fire raged through the 100 block, damaging five warehouses which were considered among Alexandria’s most important buildings.  These warehouses contained grain and fertilizer, and the loss of property and structure was estimated at the time at about $100,000.  
 
The woes of Alexandria's Great Fire of 1872 appear to have revisited 100 King in recent years. Shuttered for nearly a year after the unfortunate failure of 100 King Restaurant, in which DC restaurateur Peter Malios lost $4.2 million on a BB&T loan which put the location into Foreclosure and then Public Auction, the beleaguered property has become a symbol of a recession that's hit home, hard.  
 
Speculation about the destiny of the property has run rampant.  But the building has seen many dark times and has always been born again to something new.

History provides little information about the exchange building during the first half of the 20th Century, but most Old Towners will remember the down-at-the-heel appearance of many buildings prior to the reconstruction of the Torpedo Factory and Old Town’s rennaissance.  Some will also remember a Mexican restaurant, which closed, and then the hopeful arrival of Restaurant 100 King.

Photo by John Arundel/Local Kicks <br /> <br />The upstairs is a grand dining room with 25-foot high ornamented ceilings and sky-high windows.  <br />
Photo by John Arundel/Local Kicks
The upstairs is a grand dining room with 25-foot high ornamented
ceilings and sky-high windows.

Local Kicks has learned that the family which owns the touristy Mai Thai restaurant at the bottom of King Street intends to soon open a pan-Asian style restaurant on the property.  
 
Teerawood Tongruts, son of Thai immigrants and all of 26 years old, told us that his new venture will open in late September.  
 
“The venue will be called Red Curry, and will offer fine dining,” explains Tongruts. “With a sushi bar, and dishes representing the best of all Asian countries—Korea, Japan, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, India, Vietnam—all of them.”  
 
With no less than three Thai restaurants in Old Town, two sushi restaurants, and one Indian, competition in the Asian fare market will undoubtedly be steep.
 
Tongruts appears unphased.  
 
“The venue is affordable to us, and the opportunity is there for us,” he says confidently. “We believe that in a year’s time, the economy will have come back, so we feel that this is a good long term investment.”
 

Photo by Flickr/Mr T in DC <br /> <br />Local Kicks has learned that the family which owns the touristy Mai Thai restaurant at the bottom of King Street intends to soon open a pan-Asian style restaurant on the property.  Teerawood Tongruts, told us that his new venture will open in late September.
Photo by Flickr/Mr T in DC
Local Kicks has learned that the family which owns the touristy
Mai Thai restaurant at the bottom of King Street intends to soon
open a pan-Asian style restaurant on the property. Teerawood
Tongruts, told us that his new venture will open in late September.

Red Curry will be Tongruts’ first venture.
 
Time will tell whether the young entrepreneur’s boldness will pay off in this prime location, but he follows the tradition of businessmen before him who saw opportunity shining in the windows of the old corn exchange at 100 King.  
 
Contact the writer at kirstenobadal@hotmail.com



Loading Loading..


Shopping and Services Guide


Exclusive deals from the best locals!

Browse our highlighted partners
Spas, retailers, restaurants and…
so much more.