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CNN's Dana Bash and the New Face of Journalism

Gale Curcio
By Gale Curcio
Posted on Nov 11,2009
Filed Under News , Community,
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Photo by Gale Curcio/Local Kicks<br /> <br />“I’m on CNN.com all the time,
Photo by Gale Curcio/Local Kicks
“I’m on CNN.com all the time," says CNN's Dana Bash. "Most of
my TV pieces are online – there is almost no difference.”

ALEXANDRIA, VA - Unlike a few years ago, online coverage is now part of Dana Bash’s life.
 
“I’m on CNN.com all the time," she says. "Most of my TV pieces are online – there is almost no difference.”

This came in response to a question asked of the CNN senior congressional correspondent as she served as keynote speaker of the 20th Annual Washington PR Woman of the Year Awards Luncheon held last week at the Marriott at Metro Center.  In attendance were public relations professionals, including several from Alexandria.

Photo by Gale Curcio/Local Kicks<br /> <br />Special Olympics Chair Timothy P. Shriver was on hand to support the nomination of Special Olympcs' Kirsten Suto Seckler.<br />
Photo by Gale Curcio/Local Kicks
Special Olympics Chair Timothy P. Shriver
was on hand to support the nomination of
Special Olympcs' Kirsten Suto Seckler.

At the event Bash spoke about the "scoop" that changed her life. She overheard a classified briefing that discussed a message that was intercepted on September 10, 2001, the fateful day before 9/11. Unfortunately the message "The match begins tomorrow" wasn’t translated until September 12, 2001.

Bash received the prestigious Dirksen Award from the National Press Foundation when she broke the story of the government's secret intercepts of al Qaeda on Sept. 10, 2001. The tip fast forwarded her career.

During her time covering the White House, Bash said she was lucky to have mentors and feels that it's important to help younger female professionals in their careers.

“Being a woman now in journalism is nothing like it was in my mother’s day,” said Bash, referring to her mother, Frances Weinman Schwartz, an educator in Jewish studies and author of several books.

Alsp honored at the event were Jody Arlington of PR Collaborative, Georgetown Entertainment and Media Alliance;  Kirsten Suto Seckler of DC Special Olympics; and Sarah Temple of Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.

Temple was selected as the Washington PR Woman of the Year in part because of her leadership in the "red dress" campaign, a national movement founded by the American Heart Association to warn women about heart disease.

All of the nominees come with high credentials. Among other things, Arlington is involved with the project of the National Education Association that's producing the movie "Precious."

As director of Global Brand Marketing and Awareness, Special Olympics' Suto Seckler was responsible for the campaign to remove the "r" (retarded) word from people’s vocabulary. She has also been the anchor through some tough times, including the death of Eunice Shriver last August. Eunice’s son, Tim Shriver, was on hand for the event, along with several tables of Special Olympics colleagues.

For more information about Washington Women in PR, visit wwpr.org.



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